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Posts Tagged ‘oil painting’

Duke Mansion. Charlotte, NC

Today I was lucky enough to paint with a group of Charlotte artists Plein Air Buds. I hope to continue painting with this group as much as I can! It was a wonderful day. The Duke Mansion was in the process of being redecorated, it was interesting to watch. Not much painting was done since I just met many people for the first time and there were conversations and introductions. Hope to be more accomplished the next time I go to paint outside!16195052_10100815174646910_2271659526649153987_n16195386_10100815174317570_1959280178862776418_n16388290_10100815174357490_2443768686008959549_n

I started with a small sketch (above) and then a bigger sketch (below). 16195136_10100815174432340_8842136982458500817_nScratched out the trees that were light on a dark background with the intention to “finish later”. I have a pile of such “finish later” paintings at home… 15966138_10100815174592020_6479656567394046652_n

It is not the result that matters! It’s the process! Like and share if you agree 🙂

 

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I just stumbled upon an interesting article about William Cummings. He expressed ideas similar to mine: Bill Cumming. 1960s.

“There is only art. Every single human being is born containing an artist, and this being invents art for itself at around the age of three when, without any teaching or coaching or indoctrination, it invents shape.”

He believed firmly that training in “so-called commercial art” is superior to university art schools because students develop skills that allow them to survive in the world, to understand how the art world operates, and to handle the financial end of working as an artist. “Fine art is a war,” he said. “I hate fine art with all its fuss and crap. Fine art students are brought up in a spirit of contempt for people. Of course I paint for the market. So did Rembrandt. So did Titian. It’s high time we quit compartmentalizing art, and leave graduating students thinking they need a grant to make a living.”

William Cumming My Dog

William Cumming My Dog

He taught his students, “You have a right to make money out of art. To make money out of art, you have to create art which someone wants to buy. It’s okay if your drawing is crude. That’s how nature meant it to be. The question is how do you turn crude into a marketable commodity.”

This is something that I would say to my students too. I wanted to share this with you. See the entire article at: http://www.historylink.org

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offered at Danville Museum of Fine Art and History
by Alla Parsons

May 24, 25, 26 – Introduction to Portrait Painting in Oils

$125 for Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History members
$135 for non-members (includes model fee)
This class will concentrate on basic principles of drawing and painting a human head from observation. We will study proportions, angling, measuring, values, and color choices.
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Friday, May 24: 8 – 10 PM (Introduction – Bring Sketchbook)
Saturday, May 25: 10 AM – 5 PM (with Lunch Break) – Painting antique plaster head
Sunday, May 26: 2 – 5 PM – Painting Live Model (female)

June 7, 8, 9 – Painting Outdoors With Vibrant Colors: Theory and Practice in Oils

$110 for Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History members

$120 for non-members

This class will concentrate on color and color application aimed towards brilliance and vibrancy of color based on principles taught at the Cape Cod Art School:
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The methods of Plein Air painting originally developed and taught by Charles Hawthorne and Henry Hensche are unique and revolutionary. Based on seeing color relationships in light, and using paint to express those color relationships, the Cape School methods enable the painter to express the light effects of different times and types of day, and to employ a greater variety of color relationships in an individual painting.

Friday, Julne 7: 8 – 10 PM

Saturday, June 8 – 10AM – 5 PM (with Lunch Break)

Sunday, June 9: 2 – 5 PM

July 26, 27, 28 – Drawing Historical Downtown Buildings

Choice of Pencil, Ink, Watercolor, or Oil

$110 for Danville Museum of Fine Arts and History members

$120 for non-members

This is going to be a relaxed class where you are welcome to work in your favorite medium and apply principles of perspective from the first session to sketching, drawing or painting historical downtown buildings. You will need some sort of outdoor easel (first three who sign up may use an easel from the instructor). Or if you prefer – just a portable chair and sketchbook.
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Friday, July 26: 8 – 10 PM

Saturday, July 27 – 10AM – 5 PM (with Lunch Break)

Sunday, July 28: 2 – 5 PM

Danville Museum of Fine Art and History

www.AllaParsons.com

Space is limited! Please, sign up ASAP by replying to this email!

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I was going to publish more stories about my paintings and then a friend asked “Why the crow?” So I will start from this one.

In the Room With Memories

In the Room With Memories

The crow in the painting “In a Room With Memories”  is a memory from my childhood.  My mother had a pet crow.  The crow just came into the open window one day and stayed to live with us. We gave her name Viktoria (“Vichka”). She loved my mother and hated me, probably out of jealousy,  and sometimes tried to bite me.  I was only 4 years old, I was scared, but fascinated with the crow and was trying to gain her trust.  In doing so, I learned to speak like a crow, but that just seemed to annoy her.  In this painting I am finally becoming friends with the crow and making peace with my memories.

The image of the crow is appearing again in the “Self-Portrait in the Red Turban”. I thought about how the feeling of me being rejected by the crow in my childhood is similar to the feeling of being rejected by the art world. I felt rejected when I heard from someone at about the age 14: “There had never been great women artists.”  At first I tried to argue but I had no facts to prove the opposite.  During the 1970s in the Soviet Union no one knew about Artemisia Gentileschi,  Georgia O’Keefe, or Lee Miller.  It was obvious that all “great artists” of both present and the past were men, especially those who chose to join the Communist Party.  I heard negative remarks about “women’s art” which was often considered unimportant and limited to flowers and such.  At the same time in the United States Linda Nochlin’s 1971 article, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” was published.  It is ironic that the same words that empowered women artists in the United States made me give up my dream of becoming an artist in the USSR.

Self-Portrait in a Red Turban

Self-Portrait in a Red Turban

The image of the crows in this work represents great artists whom I envied and wanted to join but was rejected.  Just like being rejected by the crow in my childhood with whom I wanted to be friends.  There is a statement in this work that I do belong to the art world.  I state this by representing myself in Van Eyck’s famous red turban and by painting crow feathers on my coat.  This connects me to the art world as well as to the crows’ world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

crow

 

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OK! While I really should be in my studio, painting, I will spend a little more time in a virtual world, boasting about myself. Actually, about having a great friend, a poet, Tom Kirby-Smith who wrote a great poem about my art for my book:

MAGIC CASEMENTS
“ . . . magic casements, opening on the foam
Of perilous seas, in faery lands forlorn”
–Keats

Alla Parsons’ paintings speak to me
As in the song, “Do you see what I see?”Window
Her gaze transfigures all that she beholds—
Clouds, faces, trees—the sunlight that enfolds
Those creeping wavelets, distant church’s spire—
Bare-breasted angels on bright wings aspire–
A croissant on a plate, a pot of tea,
Two smiling women—suffused with mystery—
As Jane Ann wrote me, “haunting, mystical”–
All Alla! But not one bit egotistical.
“Come to the window; sweet is the night air,”
Said Matthew Arnold to his lover there
Above the Dover cliffs. Let Alla call us
(What happier invitation could befall us!)
To share the windows of her soul, and see
Within those magic frames the mystery
Transforming common things until they seem
“The glory and the freshness of a dream”
As yet another poet wrote. Open this book,
There’s nothing else to say. Just, simply, “Look!”

Tom Kirby-Smith

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001_self_in_red_turban

My work “Self-Portrait in a Red Turban” was published in:

The Lexikon of Fantastic Artists (2nd german extended edition) ISBN: 9-783848263073

The official presentation of the book is Saturday, February 23, 2013 11:00 a.m. at the PhantastenMuseum Wien
Palais Palffy 1010 Vienna Josefsplatz 6

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After a long period of travel abroad we moved to Virginia just in time to meet the New 2012 Year…

March  – “Between Reality and Imagination”” – solo show at the Gourmet Frog

June – “7 Visions”” – group show with 6 other local artists who invited me to participate in a group critique on a monthly basis

July – “Figuratively Speaking” solo show of figurative works at the Artery Gallery in Greensboro, NC

August – work was accepted into the prestigious “Virginia Artists” juried show in Hampton, VA

September – Tunisia Art Festival – an artist residency with artists from 18 different countries in Monastir, Tunisia

November – awarded an Honorable mention at Danville Art League juried show

December – work was accepted and sold at the prestigious “Winter Show” in Green Hill Center, Greensboro, NC

Work accepted for publication in Vienna, Austria – Catalog of Fantastic Realism

Two solo shows scheduled: one for 2013 in South Boston, VA and another for 2014 at the Museum of Fine Art and History in Danville, VA

I guess it was a good year!

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